Search our Advertisers



Banner
Banner
News - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 14:00
On Saturday, Cliff Coultes celebrated his 55th anniversary since entering the sacred profession of teaching. He marked the occasion, as he usually does, with an evening of family entertainment at the Auburn Community Centre. The evening featured the violin and piano stylings of John Jewitt and Marie Flynn, a recitation by Gordon Shobbrook, piano by John Campbell and Catherine MacDonald and this presentation by Pastor Jason Barlow, the master of ceremonies for the event, and his family.  (Jim Brown photo)
On Saturday, Cliff Coultes celebrated his 55th anniversary since entering the sacred profession of teaching. He marked the occasion, as he usually does, with an evening of family entertainment at the Auburn Community Centre. The evening featured the violin and piano stylings of John Jewitt and Marie Flynn, a recitation by Gordon Shobbrook, piano by John Campbell and Catherine MacDonald and this presentation by Pastor Jason Barlow, the master of ceremonies for the event, and his family.  (Jim Brown photo)
 
Festival to Host Community Play 'Christmas in Clover' - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:56
The Blyth Festival is once again hoping to engage the community over the holiday season with the final project of its 40th anniversary season.
Christmas in Clover, a play first produced by the Festival in 1989, will be on the stage of Memorial Hall this November, hopefully with members of the community filling its roles.
The play was first written by Citizen Publisher and Festival Co-Founder Keith Roulston for the Young Company in 1989. Roulston took a handful of holiday-themed stories written by Harry J. Boyle and put them together for the Christmas season.
Boyle was born in St. Augustine and it was the adaptation of his book, Mostly in Clover, written in 1961, that launched the Festival to where it is today.
For Christmas in Clover, Roulston gleaned stories from Boyle’s books Mostly in Clover, Homebrew and Patches and With a Pinch of Sin to create a Christmas story.
One of the play’s most prevalent stories is that of a Chinese couple visiting the Village of Clover in the 1930s.
The story, Roulston says, becomes one familiar to holiday readers similar to the birth of Jesus and there being “no room at the inn”.
The couple has to stop in Clover to get gas, but with no one willing to help them, the woman, who is pregnant, goes into labour and the community promptly rallies around the couple, helping them in their time of need.
Roulston says it’s great to have his play back on the stage, mostly because it is an opportunity to bring Boyle’s work back into the spotlight.
“Harry’s books are so important to our way of life,” Roulston said, adding that Boyle had been “out of the limelight” for a while.
The books, Roulston says, provide such an important window into life in Huron County in the 1920s and 1930s that it can’t be overstated how historically important they are, especially around the time of the Great Depression.
“This is very much a Depression play,” Roulston said.
He says that historical records like Boyle’s, as well as other forms of media, are so important when understanding where we’ve come from.
“They’re part of what shaped us into the people we are today,” Roulston said.
Festival Director of Marketing and Development John McHenry will be doing a different type of directing for the show, but it’s something he’s very used to in his previous career stops.
He says that everyone in the community is welcome to audition, because the play will require a large, diverse cast.
There are a lot of roles to cast, McHenry says, but there is a great need for an ensemble made up of people of all ages.
One of the most important scenes in the play, he says, is from the school’s Christmas concert, so children will most definitely be needed.
Auditions will be held later this month on Friday, Oct. 10 from 7-10 p.m. and on Saturday, Oct. 11 from 2-4 p.m.
The cast will then have about six weeks to rehearse before the play hits the stage the weekend of Nov. 28-30. Depending on its popularity, McHenry says, it may be on stage for a second weekend, but that has yet to be determined.
Rehearsals, McHenry says, will be Tuesday and Thursday nights and Sunday afternoons. He says that while the group will remain dedicated to producing an excellent play, there will be a lot of fun to be had.
“If you’ve ever wanted to be on the stage at the Blyth Festival, now’s your chance,” McHenry says, adding that anybody and everybody is encouraged to come out and be part of the play.
The Blyth Festival is once again hoping to engage the community over the holiday season with the final project of its 40th anniversary season.
Christmas in Clover, a play first produced by the Festival in 1989, will be on the stage of Memorial Hall this November, hopefully with members of the community filling its roles.
The play was first written by Citizen Publisher and Festival Co-Founder Keith Roulston for the Young Company in 1989. Roulston took a handful of holiday-themed stories written by Harry J. Boyle and put them together for the Christmas season.
Boyle was born in St. Augustine and it was the adaptation of his book, Mostly in Clover, written in 1961, that launched the Festival to where it is today.
For Christmas in Clover, Roulston gleaned stories from Boyle’s books Mostly in Clover, Homebrew and Patches and With a Pinch of Sin to create a Christmas story.
One of the play’s most prevalent stories is that of a Chinese couple visiting the Village of Clover in the 1930s.
The story, Roulston says, becomes one familiar to holiday readers similar to the birth of Jesus and there being “no room at the inn”.
The couple has to stop in Clover to get gas, but with no one willing to help them, the woman, who is pregnant, goes into labour and the community promptly rallies around the couple, helping them in their time of need.
Roulston says it’s great to have his play back on the stage, mostly because it is an opportunity to bring Boyle’s work back into the spotlight.
“Harry’s books are so important to our way of life,” Roulston said, adding that Boyle had been “out of the limelight” for a while.
The books, Roulston says, provide such an important window into life in Huron County in the 1920s and 1930s that it can’t be overstated how historically important they are, especially around the time of the Great Depression.
“This is very much a Depression play,” Roulston said.
Read more...
 
Orr Insurance, 'The Citizen' to Host All-Candidates Meeting in Blyth - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:50
North Huron Publishing, the parent company of The Citizen, and Orr Insurance are co-hosting an all-candidates meeting at Blyth Memorial Hall on Tuesday, Oct. 14.
With the deadline for North Huron mail-in voting set for Wednesday, Oct. 15, this will be a chance for Blyth and East Wawanosh residents to hear from their local candidates and ask questions pertaining to this month’s municipal election.
The Citizen has invited all three reeve candidates and candidates running in the Blyth and East Wawanosh Wards of North Huron, as well as the two people running for the trustee position on the Avon Maitland District School Board.
Running for reeve are incumbent Neil Vincent, Wingham Ward Councillor Bernie Bailey and Steve Hill. The four people vying for two seats in the Blyth Ward are incumbents Brock Vodden and Bill Knott, both of Blyth, Laurie Macpherson of RR3, Blyth and Brad Carther of Wingham.
Running for the two East Wawanosh Ward seats are incumbents Ray Hallahan and Jim Campbell and newcomers James Taylor, Terry Brake, Jim Woodley and Tim Walden.
Running for school board trustee are longtime incumbent Colleen Schenk and newcomer Mike Starenky.
The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. and will be moderated by Huron Chapel’s Mark Royall of Blyth.
The Citizen and Orr Insurance welcome all residents to attend the meeting. It will be the last chance to meet the candidates and ask important questions about the future of your community before the mail-in voting deadline.
For more information on the meeting, call The Citizen’s Shawn Loughlin at 519-523-4792.
North Huron Publishing, the parent company of The Citizen, and Orr Insurance are co-hosting an all-candidates meeting at Blyth Memorial Hall on Tuesday, Oct. 14.
With the deadline for North Huron mail-in voting set for Wednesday, Oct. 15, this will be a chance for Blyth and East Wawanosh residents to hear from their local candidates and ask questions pertaining to this month’s municipal election.
The Citizen has invited all three reeve candidates and candidates running in the Blyth and East Wawanosh Wards of North Huron, as well as the two people running for the trustee position on the Avon Maitland District School Board.
Running for reeve are incumbent Neil Vincent, Wingham Ward Councillor Bernie Bailey and Steve Hill. The four people vying for two seats in the Blyth Ward are incumbents Brock Vodden and Bill Knott, both of Blyth, Laurie Macpherson of RR3, Blyth and Brad Carther of Wingham.
Running for the two East Wawanosh Ward seats are incumbents Ray Hallahan and Jim Campbell and newcomers James Taylor, Terry Brake, Jim Woodley and Tim Walden.
Running for school board trustee are longtime incumbent Colleen Schenk and newcomer Mike Starenky.
The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. and will be moderated by Huron Chapel’s Mark Royall of Blyth.
The Citizen and Orr Insurance welcome all residents to attend the meeting. It will be the last chance to meet the candidates and ask important questions about the future of your community before the mail-in voting deadline.
For more information on the meeting, call The Citizen’s Shawn Loughlin at 519-523-4792.
 
Winthrop's Dodds Impresses at World Plowing Competition - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:45
Paul Dodds recently returned from Saint Jean D’Illac in Bordeaux, France where the World Plowing Competition was held in August and said the trip was a great experience.
Dodds, who won at the local, provincial and national plowing competitions over the last year to secure his spot representing Canada, finished 20th at the competition and said he had a lot of fun competing.
“The trip was a great experience,” he said. “Everything was fun, there wasn’t anything in particular that sticks out, it was just all enjoyable.”
Dodds said the first five days of his trip were spent receiving his equipment, rebuilding it and practising.
“After that, we had some time to rest and take some tours, and then we were on to the competition,” he explained.
Plowing on foreign soil was definitely a unique experience, Dodds said.
“The soil was really sandy,” he said. “A lot of the guys described it like plowing a beach. It was different than what I’m used to and [it] didn’t hold together the same as something that has more clay or body to it. It definitely made for a challenge.”
While Dodds said the soil was a unique challenge as it was something he wasn’t used to, he said most of the competitors seemed similarly challenged by it, meaning it wasn’t a factor in the final results.
Beyond the soil, Dodds said the skill of his fellow plowmen was also tough.
“It was really stiff competition,” he said. “There were some exceptional plowmen there. It was probably near what I thought it was going to be, but just a little tougher on top of that, however until you’re actually there, in the competition, it’s tough to anticipate.”
Off the fields, however, the competition was anything but tough, Dodds said.
“It was good to meet people like that,” Dodds said. “The competition was serious, but everyone was friends before and afterwards. It was quite easy to get along with everyone.”
While new friends were good, Dodds said it was nice to have the support he had there in the form of his family and even his employers, the McGavins.
“It was great to look up and see those people on the headlands watching,” he said. “For them to come all that distance to be there was just amazing.”
While Dodds won’t be eligible for the Canadian or world plowing matches this year, as he finished third in the International Plowing Match outside of Barrie in September, he said he’s going to keep pushing on the next few years.
“It’s definitely something I hope I can repeat,” he said. “That said, at this point it’s a once-in-a-lifetime experience and anyone who gets the opportunity to do it should. It’s well worth it.”
A Canadian flag raising ceremony was held at the World Plowing Competition in France early in September to mark the presence of plower Paul Dodds, above, second from left. Shown above are, from left: Canadian Representitive on World Plowing board Jim Sache, Dodds, Bob Campsall, and Dodds’ coach Daryl Hostrawsen.   (Photos submitted)
Paul Dodds recently returned from Saint Jean D’Illac in Bordeaux, France where the World Plowing Competition was held in August and said the trip was a great experience.
Dodds, who won at the local, provincial and national plowing competitions over the last year to secure his spot representing Canada, finished 20th at the competition and said he had a lot of fun competing.
“The trip was a great experience,” he said. “Everything was fun, there wasn’t anything in particular that sticks out, it was just all enjoyable.”
Dodds said the first five days of his trip were spent receiving his equipment, rebuilding it and practising.
“After that, we had some time to rest and take some tours, and then we were on to the competition,” he explained.
Plowing on foreign soil was definitely a unique experience, Dodds said.
“The soil was really sandy,” he said. “A lot of the guys described it like plowing a beach. It was different than what I’m used to and [it] didn’t hold together the same as something that has more clay or body to it. It definitely made for a challenge.”
While Dodds said the soil was a unique challenge as it was something he wasn’t used to, he said most of the competitors seemed similarly challenged by it, meaning it wasn’t a factor in the final results.
Beyond the soil, Dodds said the skill of his fellow plowmen was also tough.
“It was really stiff competition,” he said. “There were some exceptional plowmen there. It was probably near what I thought it was going to be, but just a little tougher on top of that, however until you’re actually there, in the competition, it’s tough to anticipate.”
Off the fields, however, the competition was anything but tough, Dodds said.
Winthrop-area resident Paul Dodds, at the beginning of September, competed in the World Plowing Contest at Saint Jean D’Illac in Bordeaux, France. He placed 20th out of the nearly 40 competitors involved.   (Photo submitted)
Last Updated on Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:49
Read more...
 
Huron County 'Rules' International Plowing Match - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:41
The International Plowing Match featured talent from all across the province and beyond, but, as Class Two Group One Reserve Champion Lucas Townsend said, it felt like Huron County was the big winner.
“It felt good,” he said. “It really felt like Huron County ruled the International Plowing Match.”
Townsend, alongside Brian and Jeff McGavin and Paul Dodds, as well as other participants from Huron County, travelled to Barrie area earlier this month to participate in the week long event.
Walton’s Brian McGavin was the reserve champion for Class 5, Group 1 which is the Ontario Championship Tractor Class. The finish buys him a shot at the Canadian plowing title in 2015 which comes with a chance to compete at the world competition.
“I really didn’t have any aspirations going into the competition,” he said. “I went into the class because I saw a father and son plowing in the competition.”
Brian’s son Brandon is known locally for his plowing prowess though, as he is attending school in Alberta, he isn’t competing for his native province.
While the earlier part of the competition was rough, Brian said, later throughout the week improved.
“The land wasn’t great, but as the week went on, things started to clear up,” he said, adding things were really close. “Anyone in that class could have won, I was just fortunate enough to get the points for reserve.
“It really made things difficult to forecast because you could be first one day and come 10th the next day,” he said. “The land helped, but there must have been a plowing god looking out for me.”
The closest to Brian’s score was another Huron County competitor, Paul Dodds, who recently returned from the International Plowing Competition where he placed 20th overall.
“I was only behind by like 15 points for the win, but Paul was right on my heels,” Brian said. “He was third by only three points, I was fortunate to get out of there.”
The division, aside from providing some stiff competition from other plowers, also provided challenges for all participants, Brian said, pointing to larger fields and the time frame as big challenges.
“The lands are much bigger so you have to keep moving,” Brian said. “It’s definitely a totally different experience, but when you get to that level, when you’re going to the Canadian match, you have to get ready for that.
“The plots are 20 metres wide and 330 feet [approximately 100 metres] long and they have to be plowed in two hours and 40 minutes,” he said. “When you’re doing that with a two-furrow plow, you really have to keep moving. There were a couple times that I thought I must have only had 15 seconds left, but everyone was fairly close.”
Brian said that, despite the challenges, everyone from Huron County did well and he said he’s proud of his neighbours for all the efforts they put forward. He also said he hopes to continue plowing in the future, though, in the more immediate future he may take a step back to help prepare for the International Plowing Match in 2017 which is set to be hosted in Walton.
Brian’s brother Jeff was also a reserve champion in the Class 2 Group 4 section, for  contestants 20 and over.
Jeff said that, while the category is for 20 and over, most of the contestants were 30 and over. While this particular category doesn’t continue on to any other championships, Jeff netting the win is quite a story because he came out of retirement to do it.
“It was good and interesting to be a part of it,” Jeff said. “I hadn’t plowed for over 20 years, since I went away to school, but I was helping the kids in 4-H and [his son] Jacob in the meantime and when it came to the competition, I figured I’d give it a whirl and see if I had any knack for it still.”
He certainly did have a knack, coming in second in his category to a competitor from the U.S.
“It was a lot of fun getting back into the groove,” he said. “It was really nice to be back with some of the guys I used to compete against, it was almost like some kind of fraternity reunion.”
Jeff said that while it was fun, the experience was also an educational one.
“It was quite an eye-opener to see the level of competition you have to be at,” he said. “I was fortunate everything came together. I didn’t hit any stones and I must still have an eye for the straight cut.”
The win could mark somewhat of a resurgence for Jeff who said that if everything worked well, he would continue to compete.
“I think I’m rejuvenated,” he said. “I think it’ll probably be something I’m back at full-time for awhile again.”
While he doesn’t think he’s ready for the Class 5 competition his brother placed so well in, Jeff said he was happy to be part of Huron County’s team and bring some of the glory home.
Townsend was part of Class 2  Group 1 which features contestants aged 10 to 15 and he said he was very happy with the way the event ended.
“It feels good winning, but I don’t know if it felt different,” he said. “Throughout the competition, I mostly felt like I knew I was doing good, but some days I was shocked at how well things went.”
Townsend, who lives in Blyth, said he has been plowing for about four years and that, win, lose or draw, he enjoys it because it allows him to meet new friends.
“It’s good to do it because, even if I’m not a farmer, it lets me meet some people who are and just make friends through that,” he said. “It’s a fun experience.”
Townsend explained that since he started he has hoped to compete at the International, and was glad he was able to. He said a lot of the credit goes to his coach and grandfather George Townsend.
“He really helped with getting ready, adjusting the plow and making sure everything went well,” he said.
Some of the credit for his success also has to go to the 4-H Sodbusters Club, of which Townsend is a member.
“It was fun being a part of the group and we learned a lot,” he said.
That education was important because, as a plowman who doesn’t have his own field, Townsend didn’t get much practice between the Huron County Plowing Match in August and the competition near Barrie.
“I basically wasn’t on a plow between the two events,” he said.
Townsend said he plans on being part of the Sodbusters Club again next year and encourages everyone to do it.
“You don’t know if you’re going to be good or not until you try and if you’re not, you can practice,” he said.
Lucas Townsend, second from left, was the reserve champion for the International Plowing Match’s Class Two Group One competition. The competition was held in Ivy last month. Shown celebrating above are, from left: Townsend’s grandfather George Townsend, Townsend, Alex Townsend and Liberal Party of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau.   (Photo submitted)
The International Plowing Match featured talent from all across the province and beyond, but, as Class Two Group One Reserve Champion Lucas Townsend said, it felt like Huron County was the big winner.
“It felt good,” he said. “It really felt like Huron County ruled the International Plowing Match.”
Townsend, alongside Brian and Jeff McGavin and Paul Dodds, as well as other participants from Huron County, travelled to Barrie area earlier this month to participate in the week long event.
Walton’s Brian McGavin was the reserve champion for Class 5, Group 1 which is the Ontario Championship Tractor Class. The finish buys him a shot at the Canadian plowing title in 2015 which comes with a chance to compete at the world competition.
“I really didn’t have any aspirations going into the competition,” he said. “I went into the class because I saw a father and son plowing in the competition.”
Brian’s son Brandon is known locally for his plowing prowess though, as he is attending school in Alberta, he isn’t competing for his native province.
While the earlier part of the competition was rough, Brian said, later throughout the week improved.
“The land wasn’t great, but as the week went on, things started to clear up,” he said, adding things were really close. “Anyone in that class could have won, I was just fortunate enough to get the points for reserve.
“It really made things difficult to forecast because you could be first one day and come 10th the next day,” he said. “The land helped, but there must have been a plowing god looking out for me.”
The closest to Brian’s score was another Huron County competitor, Paul Dodds, who recently returned from the International Plowing Competition where he placed 20th overall.
“I was only behind by like 15 points for the win, but Paul was right on my heels,” Brian said. “He was third by only three points, I was fortunate to get out of there.”
The division, aside from providing some stiff competition from other plowers, also provided challenges for all participants, Brian said, pointing to larger fields and the time frame as big challenges.
“The lands are much bigger so you have to keep moving,” Brian said. “It’s definitely a totally different experience, but when you get to that level, when you’re going to the Canadian match, you have to get ready for that.
“The plots are 20 metres wide and 330 feet [approximately 100 metres] long and they have to be plowed in two hours and 40 minutes,” he said. “When you’re doing that with a two-furrow plow, you really have to keep moving. There were a couple times that I thought I must have only had 15 seconds left, but everyone was fairly close.”
The International Plowing Match, held in Ivy, near Barrie, last month, saw a lot of final results featuring familiar Huron County names. Shown are the reserve champions of three of the categories. From left are Class Two Group One Reserve Champion Lucas Townsend, Class 5 Group One Reserve Champion Brian McGavin and Class Two Group Four Reserve Champion Jeff McGavin.    (Photo submitted)
Read more...
 
Mail-in, Internet-based Voting to Start Soon - Oct. 2 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 13:34
Those anticipating casting their vote in the upcoming Oct. 27 municipal election may not have as much time to do so as they might think.
With many Huron County municipalities abandoning traditional ballot box voting, mail-in and internet-based voting will now take over in this October’s election, drastically moving up the voting deadline in many cases.
These new methods have led to voting periods that are much longer and much earlier than traditional voting that takes place on the day of the election.
In North Huron, vote-by-mail kits were scheduled to be sent to eligible voters on Oct. 1. The kit will include a voting instruction sheet, a ballot, a ballot secrecy envelope, a voter declaration form and a return envelope (yellow) with prepaid postage.
Voters are being instructed to make sure their ballots are in the mail by Wednesday, Oct. 15 to ensure delivery to the municipal office by Monday, Oct. 27. To ensure delivery, or to have more time to decide, voters can also drop ballots off to the North Huron Township office at 274 Josephine Street in Wingham during regular business hours until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
Similarly, Morris-Turnberry and Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh (ACW), as they both did in the 2010 election, will also be running a vote-by-mail system.
In Morris-Turnberry, ballots should be in the mail by the beginning of the month, to be mailed back by Oct. 17. Ballots can also be dropped off at the Morris-Turnberry Municipal Office at 41342 Morris Road until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
There will be drop boxes at nursing and retirement homes on Oct. 27 from 2-4 p.m.
ACW vote-by-mail kits will have been sent out early this week and have to be mailed back by Oct. 18. A drop-off location will be set up at the ACW Municipal Office at 82133 Council Line, RR5, Goderich until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
Both Morris-Turnberry and ACW vote-by-mail kits will include the same five items as listed in North Huron’s aforementioned kit.
Huron East and Central Huron have implemented internet-based voting through Simply Voting.
Both municipalities were planning on sending out voter information letters this week. Huron East aimed to have its letters in the mail by Sept. 29, while Central Huron is planning to have them in the mail by the end of the week.
The letters will include a personal identification number (PIN) that will need to be used when voting on the internet. As an added security measure, voters will have to enter their date of birth when voting, in addition to the PIN they receive from the municipality.
If an elector’s date of birth is incomplete, or missing, a different voter information letter will be sent, which includes a message informing the elector that before voting, a visit to the municipal office to prove their date of birth will be in order.
The voting period will open on Friday Oct. 10 at 4:30 p.m. and will run until Monday, Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
A special voting kiosk will also be set up at the Huron East Municipal Office at 72 Main Street in Seaforth during regular office hours beginning Tuesday, Oct. 14 to Friday, Oct. 24 and on Monday, Oct. 27 from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Huron East has scheduled two special polls. The first is at Huronview Home for the Aged on Tuesday, Oct. 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and at Seaforth Manor Nursing Home on Thursday, Oct. 16 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
If Huron East voters don’t receive a voter information letter by Oct. 6, they are instructed to contact the municipality as they may, for some reason, not be on the electors list.
The process will be nearly identical in Central Huron, as they are providing residents with internet-based voting through the same provider, Simply Voting.
The voting period will begin on Friday, Oct. 10 at 4:30 p.m. and will end at 8 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 27.
Beginning on Tuesday, Oct. 14, Central Huron will have a special voting kiosk at its municipal office at 23 Albert Street in Clinton that will include a computer, an iPad and a telephone people can use to vote. The kiosk will be open during regular office hours until election day, Oct. 27, when the kiosk will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
For those without internet access, Central Huron and Huron East suggest a visit to their local libraries in Clinton, Brussels and Seaforth. There are computers with internet access at the libraries, but no designated voting kiosks.
For more information on voting procedure for your particular municipality, be sure to call or visit the municipality’s website.
Those anticipating casting their vote in the upcoming Oct. 27 municipal election may not have as much time to do so as they might think.
With many Huron County municipalities abandoning traditional ballot box voting, mail-in and internet-based voting will now take over in this October’s election, drastically moving up the voting deadline in many cases.
These new methods have led to voting periods that are much longer and much earlier than traditional voting that takes place on the day of the election.
In North Huron, vote-by-mail kits were scheduled to be sent to eligible voters on Oct. 1. The kit will include a voting instruction sheet, a ballot, a ballot secrecy envelope, a voter declaration form and a return envelope (yellow) with prepaid postage.
Voters are being instructed to make sure their ballots are in the mail by Wednesday, Oct. 15 to ensure delivery to the municipal office by Monday, Oct. 27. To ensure delivery, or to have more time to decide, voters can also drop ballots off to the North Huron Township office at 274 Josephine Street in Wingham during regular business hours until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
Similarly, Morris-Turnberry and Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh (ACW), as they both did in the 2010 election, will also be running a vote-by-mail system.
In Morris-Turnberry, ballots should be in the mail by the beginning of the month, to be mailed back by Oct. 17. Ballots can also be dropped off at the Morris-Turnberry Municipal Office at 41342 Morris Road until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
There will be drop boxes at nursing and retirement homes on Oct. 27 from 2-4 p.m.
ACW vote-by-mail kits will have been sent out early this week and have to be mailed back by Oct. 18. A drop-off location will be set up at the ACW Municipal Office at 82133 Council Line, RR5, Goderich until Oct. 27 at 8 p.m.
Both Morris-Turnberry and ACW vote-by-mail kits will include the same five items as listed in North Huron’s aforementioned kit.
Huron East and Central Huron have implemented internet-based voting through Simply Voting.
Read more...
 
« StartPrev12NextEnd »

Page 1 of 2