Search our Advertisers



Banner
Banner
Blyth's Stevenson Goes Against the Grain to Win Huron County Art Show - Oct. 30 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 13:23
Blyth artist Kelly Stevenson decided to go against the flow when it came time to craft a visual art piece for the Huron County Art Show.
Stevenson, who had her first studio show at the Blyth Centre for the Arts during the Blyth Festival’s summer season, said she won the competition with a new piece called The Harvest; Cultivating Mechanisms.
The theme of the show was ‘Ebb and Flow’ which Stevenson said she wanted to take in a different direction.
“I had to come up with a new piece to fit the theme this year,” she said. “It’s more of a traditional landscape than some of my other works, but with a twist.”
“I didn’t want to work with water because I thought that would be the first thing people thought about,” she said. “The piece is more about the push and pull of industry and technology in rural Canada.”
Stevenson explained that she felt changes in technology and farming have pulled people away from farming and from areas like Huron County.
“People have to adapt to new manufacturing and production models,” she said. “But with the influx of those changes, we’re losing the people involved.”
The piece, which Stevenson said will be displayed in Huron County Council Chambers for the next year before it’s moved to other locations, took her four solid days to create but the creative process began long before that.
“It took me about a month to a month and a half to come up with the idea,” Stevenson said. “Then I had to do some tests for the first time in a long time to see how things would work and how the elements would mix.”
Stevenson couldn’t attend the awards ceremony and hadn’t been told she had won when she and her family visited the Huron County Museum the day after the show and exhibit opened.
Thanks to not knowing the results, she was in for a bit of a shock.
“My piece was above someone else’s on the wall,” she said. “I thought that person’s work had won because I could see the ribbon, but then I saw it was for me and it was a nice surprise.”
She has since received a letter, a cheque for the painting and a curatorial review of the piece, which she felt was very informative.
“It’s really nice to see and find out what the judges were looking for and what you had or didn’t have,” she said. “It’s also really nice to see the piece through someone else’s eyes and discover things that other people see in it.”
Stevenson beat out 38 other artists at the art show which was opened earlier this month and will stay on display at the Huron County Museum in Goderich until Dec. 21. The museum is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Sundays.
Stevenson’s piece, alongside the second place piece by Ruth Anne Merner of Dashwood, were purchased by the Huron County Art Bank.
Currently, Stevenson is working on an application for the Artist Project in Toronto which provides free space for emerging artists for the three years after they graduate school. This will be the final year she can apply for the space.
Honourable mentions from the competition included Blyth’s Jerry McDonnell’s Sunshine Cemetery, Zurich’s Lara Browne’s The Great Lake, Goderich’s William Creighton’s Timeless and Goderich’s Elizabeth Van den Broeck’s Transitioning Forest. The viewer’s choice award went to Susan Peck, of Wroxeter, for her piece Shall We Dance.
For more information, or to see the pieces, visit
www.huroncounty.ca/museum/artbank.php
The Huron County Art Bank was made possible by a donation from the estate of Susannah Lattimer, a former Morris Township resident.
Lattimer died in 1993 at the age of 99 and is buried in Blyth’s Union Cemetery.
Through her estate, she donated money to several organizations in the area after her death including the art bank.
The funding originally provided by the estate ran out in 2012 however Huron County Council decided to continue with the project, making it a part of its annual budget.
Kelly Stevenson’s The Harvest: Cultivating Mechanisms was the big winner at the 2014 Huron County Art Show earlier this month. Stevenson explained that the show’s theme, ebb and flow, immediately brought water to mind but she decided she didn’t want to go with the first reaction and instead focused on technology and agriculture and how, as the former grows, the number of people involved in the latter diminishes.  (Photo submitted)
Blyth artist Kelly Stevenson decided to go against the flow when it came time to craft a visual art piece for the Huron County Art Show.
Stevenson, who had her first studio show at the Blyth Centre for the Arts during the Blyth Festival’s summer season, said she won the competition with a new piece called The Harvest; Cultivating Mechanisms.
The theme of the show was ‘Ebb and Flow’ which Stevenson said she wanted to take in a different direction.
“I had to come up with a new piece to fit the theme this year,” she said. “It’s more of a traditional landscape than some of my other works, but with a twist.”
“I didn’t want to work with water because I thought that would be the first thing people thought about,” she said. “The piece is more about the push and pull of industry and technology in rural Canada.”
Stevenson explained that she felt changes in technology and farming have pulled people away from farming and from areas like Huron County.
“People have to adapt to new manufacturing and production models,” she said. “But with the influx of those changes, we’re losing the people involved.”
The piece, which Stevenson said will be displayed in Huron County Council Chambers for the next year before it’s moved to other locations, took her four solid days to create but the creative process began long before that.
“It took me about a month to a month and a half to come up with the idea,” Stevenson said. “Then I had to do some tests for the first time in a long time to see how things would work and how the elements would mix.”
Stevenson couldn’t attend the awards ceremony and hadn’t been told she had won when she and her family visited the Huron County Museum the day after the show and exhibit opened.
Thanks to not knowing the results, she was in for a bit of a shock.
“My piece was above someone else’s on the wall,” she said. “I thought that person’s work had won because I could see the ribbon, but then I saw it was for me and it was a nice surprise.”
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 15:21
Read more...
 
News - Oct. 30 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 13:09
When it comes time for Halloween, with the exception of a good costume, there are few things more important than candy and a great jack-o’-lantern. To that end, the Auburn Horticultural Society held its annual Village Pumpkin Party at the community hall on Saturday. The event started with facilitating the transformation from simple pumpkin to jack-
When it comes time for Halloween, with the exception of a good costume, there are few things more important than candy and a great jack-o’-lantern. To that end, the Auburn Horticultural Society held its annual Village Pumpkin Party at the community hall on Saturday. The event started with facilitating the transformation from simple pumpkin to jack-o’-lantern, to the lighting of the jack-o’-lanterns to a stomach-filling community dinner. Here, Cassie Feemey, right, left no stone unturned, and very little cupcake showing when decorating her holiday treat, while it seems like it would take a lot to break the concentration of Legend Emmerton, left, as she designs her perfect jack-o’-lantern.   (Jim Brown photos)

Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 15:18
 
Blyth Festival Doesn't Renew Contract of Artistic Director Marion de Vries - Oct. 30 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 13:05
The Blyth Centre for the Arts announced today that Marion de Vries's contract as Artistic Director, which expires Oct. 31, is not being renewed. A search committee led by the Board of Directors will begin an immediate search for a new artistic director for the Blyth Festival.
During her tenure with Blyth, de Vries has contributed a great deal of energy and passion to the Festival and Canadian theatre. Her musical, Kitchen Radio, co-composed with David Archibald, was a critical and box office hit during Blyth’s artistically exciting and successful 40th season.
De Vries leaves expressing deep appreciation for the talent and hard work of the 40th season company of artists, crew, staff and volunteers. She loves Blyth Festival/Blyth Centre for the Arts and extends best wishes for the future.
For their part the Board of Directors wishes Marion every success in her future artistic endeavours.
Marion de Vries' contract with the Blyth Festival will not be renewed, the Festival announced Monday and a search for her replacement is already underway. (File photo)
The Blyth Centre for the Arts announced today that Marion de Vries's contract as Artistic Director, which expires Oct. 31, is not being renewed. A search committee led by the Board of Directors will begin an immediate search for a new artistic director for the Blyth Festival.
During her tenure with Blyth, de Vries has contributed a great deal of energy and passion to the Festival and Canadian theatre. Her musical, Kitchen Radio, co-composed with David Archibald, was a critical and box office hit during Blyth’s artistically exciting and successful 40th season.
De Vries leaves expressing deep appreciation for the talent and hard work of the 40th season company of artists, crew, staff and volunteers. She loves Blyth Festival/Blyth Centre for the Arts and extends best wishes for the future.
For their part the Board of Directors wishes Marion every success in her future artistic endeavours.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 15:19
 
North Huron, Morris-Turnberry, Huron East, Central Huron, ACW and Goderich Election Results - Oct. 27 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 12:58
Voters were out in record numbers for Monday’s municipal election. People voted for change in some municipalities, while they voted for the status quo in others.
NORTH HURON
For the next four years North Huron Council will look very similar to the previous four years.
Reeve Neil Vincent garnered 998 votes to win a third term in North Huron’s top spot. Vincent beat out current Wingham Ward Councillor Bernie Bailey, who received 869 votes, and Steve Hill, who garnered 161 votes.
In Blyth both incumbents were re-elected as 314 votes were cast for Brock Vodden and 217 for Bill Knott. Laurie Macpherson received 86 votes, while Brad Carther finished last in the ward with 37 votes.
In East Wawanosh incumbents Ray Hallahan and James Campbell were re-elected with 280 votes and 254 votes respectively. Tim Walden finished just short with 212 votes, followed by James Taylor with 153 votes, James Woodley with 31 votes and Terry Brake with 19 votes.
In Wingham Trevor Seip was the leading vote-getter with 837 votes. Also elected was Yolanda Ritsema-Teeninga with 712 votes. Finishing short of being elected were Rod Galbraith with 307 votes, Brent Mills with 120 votes and Robert Harth with 76 votes.
MORRIS-TURNBERRY
Paul Gowing will return for a second term as Morris-Turnberry’s mayor. Gowing garnered the support of 766 voters, while contender Jamie McCallum came up just short with 649 votes.
Incumbent Jamie Heffer led the way with 893 votes for the first of five councillor positions. Heffer was followed by fellow incumbent John Smuck with 822 votes, newcomer Sharen Zinn with 814 votes, former mayor Dorothy Kelly with 688 votes and former deputy-mayor Jim Nelemans with 651.
Coming up short were Brian Schlosser with 624 votes, incumbent David Baker with 593 votes, Terry Brighton with 391 votes, Carolyn May O’Neil with 273 votes and Jennifer Wick with 205 votes.
CENTRAL HURON
In Central Huron all of the familiar names are back.
It begins with Mayor Jim Ginn and Deputy-Mayor Dave Jewitt, who were both acclaimed to second terms.
In the East Ward, all three incumbents were re-elected. Marg Anderson led the way with 840 votes, 23.5 per cent; Alex Westerhout was second with 818 votes, 22.8 per cent of the vote and Dan Colquhoun received 630 votes, 17.6 per cent of the total votes cast.
Adam Robinson was the closest candidates to not win a seat in the East Ward with 544 votes. He was followed by Morag Watt with 335 votes, Kaushik Patel with 223 votes and Gary Haist with 192 votes.
In the West Ward, incumbent Burkhard Metzger was re-elected with 544 votes, 28.1 per cent of the vote, while his fellow incumbent Alison Lobb received 25.9 per cent of the vote with 502 votes.
Newcomer Genny Smith was the third councillor elected to the West Ward with 468 votes, 24.1 per cent of the vote.
Patrick Nagle was the only West Ward candidate to not be elected. He garnered 424 votes.
HURON EAST
In Huron East both Mayor Bernie MacLellan and Deputy-Mayor Joe Steffler were acclaimed to a second term in their positions. In the Brussels Ward, incumbent David Blaney was acclaimed, as was newcomer John Lowe.
In the Grey Ward incumbents Alvin McLellan and Dianne Diehl were re-elected with 253 votes (32.5 per cent) and 249 votes (32 per cent) respectively.
Newcomer Dennie Mueller came up just short with 226 votes, followed by Orval Bauer with 49 votes.
In the McKillop Ward incumbent Andy Flowers was overtaken by newcomers Kevin Wilbee with 344 votes (43.5 per cent) and Brenda Dalton with 339 votes (42.9 per cent) respectively. Flowers garnered just 106 votes.
Both incumbents will return in the Seaforth Ward as Nathan Marshall led the way with 430 votes (39.3 per cent), followed by Bob Fisher with 368 votes (33.7 per cent). Neil Tam came in third in the ward with 295 votes.
In Tuckersmith newcomer Raymond Chartrand was the leading vote-getter with 636 votes (41.5 per cent), followed by incumbent Larry McGrath with 462 votes (30.1 per cent). Incumbent Les Falconer found himself on the outside of this year’s vote with 435 votes.
ACW
In Ashfield-Colborne-Wawanosh (ACW) long-time reeve Ben Van Diepenbeek was re-elected with 1,609 votes over his competition Shawn Drennan, who garnered 1,318 votes.
Elected in the Colborne Ward were Glen McNeil, who was the leading vote-getter with 720 votes, and Bill Vanstone with 677 votes. Coming up short were Michael Leitch with 319 votes and Arden Eddie with 144 votes.
In the Wawanosh Ward Wayne Forster led with 466 votes. Also elected was Paul Bollinger with 331 votes, while Doug Miller failed to be re-elected with just 304 votes.
In the Ashfield Ward incumbent Roger Watt was re-elected with 809 votes. Also elected was Jennifer Miltenburg with 631 votes, while newcomer Preston Drennan and incumbent Murray Curran both came up short with 432 votes and 429 votes respectively.
GODERICH
Goderich voters opted for change, ousting long-time mayor Deb Shewfelt, who received 1,480 votes, in favour of Kevin Morrison with 1,995.
Jim Donnelly was elected deputy-mayor with 1,480 votes, while Myles Murdock with 2,246 votes, Luke Elliot with 2,073 votes, Matt Hoy with 2,023 votes, Michele Hansen with 1,828 votes and Trevor Bazinet with 1,535 votes.
Incumbent Colleen Schenk was re-elected as the Avon Maitland District School Board trustee for Northeast Huron, Howick and Morris-Turnberry. She defeated newcomer Mike Starenky, although no vote totals were available at press time.
All results are unofficial at time of reporting.
Voters were out in record numbers for Monday’s municipal election. People voted for change in some municipalities, while they voted for the status quo in others.
NORTH HURON
For the next four years North Huron Council will look very similar to the previous four years.
Reeve Neil Vincent garnered 998 votes to win a third term in North Huron’s top spot. Vincent beat out current Wingham Ward Councillor Bernie Bailey, who received 869 votes, and Steve Hill, who garnered 161 votes.
In Blyth both incumbents were re-elected as 314 votes were cast for Brock Vodden and 217 for Bill Knott. Laurie Macpherson received 86 votes, while Brad Carther finished last in the ward with 37 votes.
In East Wawanosh incumbents Ray Hallahan and James Campbell were re-elected with 280 votes and 254 votes respectively. Tim Walden finished just short with 212 votes, followed by James Taylor with 153 votes, James Woodley with 31 votes and Terry Brake with 19 votes.
In Wingham Trevor Seip was the leading vote-getter with 837 votes. Also elected was Yolanda Ritsema-Teeninga with 712 votes. Finishing short of being elected were Rod Galbraith with 307 votes, Brent Mills with 120 votes and Robert Harth with 76 votes.
MORRIS-TURNBERRY
Paul Gowing will return for a second term as Morris-Turnberry’s mayor. Gowing garnered the support of 766 voters, while contender Jamie McCallum came up just short with 649 votes.
Incumbent Jamie Heffer led the way with 893 votes for the first of five councillor positions. Heffer was followed by fellow incumbent John Smuck with 822 votes, newcomer Sharen Zinn with 814 votes, former mayor Dorothy Kelly with 688 votes and former deputy-mayor Jim Nelemans with 651.
Coming up short were Brian Schlosser with 624 votes, incumbent David Baker with 593 votes, Terry Brighton with 391 votes, Carolyn May O’Neil with 273 votes and Jennifer Wick with 205 votes.
CENTRAL HURON
In Central Huron all of the familiar names are back.
It begins with Mayor Jim Ginn and Deputy-Mayor Dave Jewitt, who were both acclaimed to second terms.
In the East Ward, all three incumbents were re-elected. Marg Anderson led the way with 840 votes, 23.5 per cent; Alex Westerhout was second with 818 votes, 22.8 per cent of the vote and Dan Colquhoun received 630 votes, 17.6 per cent of the total votes cast.
Adam Robinson was the closest candidates to not win a seat in the East Ward with 544 votes. He was followed by Morag Watt with 335 votes, Kaushik Patel with 223 votes and Gary Haist with 192 votes.
Last Updated on Wednesday, 29 October 2014 13:04
Read more...
 
Breach Concerns North Huron Council - Oct. 30 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 12:52
The old adage of ‘loose lips sink ships’ might have to be reworked to ‘loose lips sink townships’ after reports of a breach of conduct surfaced at North Huron Township Council last week.
During council’s Oct. 20 meeting, Councillor James Campbell reported that a ratepayer had approached him and spoke with knowledge about decisions that had been made during a recent in-camera session of council.
“When I was out campaigning, I had a person come up to me to say what we had talked about and what was done about it was wrong three days after the meeting,” he said. “I came in and talked to [Acting Chief Administrative Officer Barb Wilson] who felt this needed to come up at council.”
From there, Wilson took over the report, presenting council and media with a staff report regarding council’s code of conduct.
“This is a very important issue and I am going to read this report into the minutes,” she explained, before reading the page-and-a-half document.
The report points out that, according to Schedule A of By-Law 72-2013, also known as the Code of Conduct for Members of Council, every member of council needs to keep confidential information they are privy to both during and after their term on council.
Wilson’s report included four different criteria for breaching the code of conduct:
• To use confidential information... to further personal interests or interests of others.
• To disclose to unauthorized persons information marked confidential to which the member of council has access by reason of his/her position as a member of council with the township.
• The obligation to keep information is a continuing obligation even after the member ceases to be a member of council.
• A member shall keep confidential any information discussed in closed session until Council directs that the information be made public.
The report also outlines how complaints will be handled, indicating that an integrity commissioner shall be appointed to investigate the breach. If a breach is found to have occurred, the township may either issue a reprimand or suspend the remuneration paid to the member of council.
Wilson also reported that the commissioner would have to be paid and that, alongside that, staff would have to help, resulting in additional costs for the municipality.
Unfortunately, the plaintiff refused to be identified, a wish that Campbell claimed he would uphold even in closed session.
“They didn’t want their name to come forward,” he said. “I had to be sure that everything is confidential.”
All council members seemed shocked by the news including Reeve Neil Vincent who said he had been told of the incident minutes before the meeting began.
Councillor Brock Vodden said that he believed the issue would have to be dealt with in closed session since the information is still supposed to be confidential, even if it had been leaked.
Vincent stated that, if any names were to be mentioned, the issue could not be dealt with in open session.
“The biggest reason for in-camera meetings is the Privacy Act,” he said. “We can’t bring out individual names for things like this, so, until somebody comes forward to basically sign the statement that they heard [the information], I don’t think there’s any chance of moving forward on it.”
Councillor Archie MacGowan suggested that the issue be left with Campbell to see if the individual would bring the complaint forward, however Campbell stated that the person had no interest in being publically known.
Vodden suggested that council go in-camera for any further discussion, however Vincent said that if specific individuals weren’t being discussed by name, council couldn’t invoke an in-camera session.
MacGowan then asked if Campbell could provide more information in an in-camera session, and while Campbell said that he could, he wouldn’t provide that information in respect to the plaintiff’s wishes which didn’t sit well with Vodden.
“In a sense, we’re all impugned by this,” he said. “At this point it could be any of us or more than one of us.”
Campbell responded by saying that issue was on council’s conscience.
“I promised I wouldn’t bring forth his name,” he said.
During open forum, Wingham resident and Blyth ward candidate Brad Carther said he felt that none of council could be trusted.
“If you sign a code of conduct, it should be followed,” he said, asking how a fair election could be held if council couldn’t be trusted.
Vincent informed Carther his question would be taken as a statement and recorded for the record.
The old adage of ‘loose lips sink ships’ might have to be reworked to ‘loose lips sink townships’ after reports of a breach of conduct surfaced at North Huron Township Council last week.
During council’s Oct. 20 meeting, Councillor James Campbell reported that a ratepayer had approached him and spoke with knowledge about decisions that had been made during a recent in-camera session of council.
“When I was out campaigning, I had a person come up to me to say what we had talked about and what was done about it was wrong three days after the meeting,” he said. “I came in and talked to [Acting Chief Administrative Officer Barb Wilson] who felt this needed to come up at council.”
From there, Wilson took over the report, presenting council and media with a staff report regarding council’s code of conduct.
“This is a very important issue and I am going to read this report into the minutes,” she explained, before reading the page-and-a-half document.
The report points out that, according to Schedule A of By-Law 72-2013, also known as the Code of Conduct for Members of Council, every member of council needs to keep confidential information they are privy to both during and after their term on council.
Wilson’s report included four different criteria for breaching the code of conduct:
• To use confidential information... to further personal interests or interests of others.
• To disclose to unauthorized persons information marked confidential to which the member of council has access by reason of his/her position as a member of council with the township.
• The obligation to keep information is a continuing obligation even after the member ceases to be a member of council.
• A member shall keep confidential any information discussed in closed session until Council directs that the information be made public.
Read more...
 
Cross-Border Servicing Holds Up Development - Oct. 30 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Shawn Loughlin   
Wednesday, 29 October 2014 12:32
North Huron Township Council decided to approve one application for services under its recently established cross-border service policy and defer another at its Oct. 20 meeting.
The first application, which was on behalf of Henry Van Heesch, owner of the Europarts company which recently opened a new showroom and work area outside of Belgrave, was approved. The second application was for a property in Morris-Turnberry.
Installation of the services, however, is deferred until Morris-Turnberry agrees to specific terms in the policy, including a payment in lieu of taxes equal to 30 per cent of the municipal taxes collected on the property.
The property, which includes the former Jag’s restaurant property on Amberley Road, is just receiving water, as sewer service was already provided.
Councillor Bill Knott asked council whether they could split the payment-in-lieu of taxes to 15 per cent since only one service was being run, however he was told that could set a risky precedent for the municipality.
Two motions were required to support servicing the Morris-Turnberry property, one to approve the connection and one to confirm this that the service will fall under the new agreement.
While council approved both motions, some questions remained as Van Heesch asked about the surcharge.
“From what I understand, the 30 per cent surcharge coming from here to Morris-Turnberry will result in Morris-Turnberry charging me 30 per cent more,” he said.
Councillor Archie MacGowan took Van Heesch’s statement as an opportunity to explain North Huron’s stance on the issue.
“As a requirement, 30 per cent of the municipal taxes they collect have to flow back to North Huron,” he said. “It’s only on the municipal portion and it’s a payment in lieu of 30 per cent. North Huron is in need of tax dollars. We’re granting the services and looking for payment in lieu of taxes.
“North Huron hasn’t ever contemplated up-charging [Morris-Turnberry ratepayers] an additional 30 per cent, this was just supposed to be a flow-through.”
Van Heesch said his understanding of the issue was Morris-Turnberry would decide at its Oct. 21 meeting, however the issue was not brought up during open session at that meeting.
“If they are going to charge us extra, I’ll withdraw the application,” he said. “It’s terrible that businesses have to pay for that.”
Van Heesch then said he believes North Huron’s request for the 30 per cent payment in lieu of taxes is reasonable.
“I fully support the payment,” he said. “I think it’s necessary, however the way the other municipality is [supposedly] recuperating those costs isn’t proper.”
MacGowan agreed with Van Heesch’s understanding of the situation.
Later during the meeting, council received correspondence from Central Huron Council supporting cost-recovery efforts, however council felt the payment-in-lieu of taxes are legally questionable.
While the two issues weren’t presented simultaneously, Central Huron’s concerns may be related to the fact that, still later during the council meeting, the issue of servicing for the gas bar, restaurant and convenience store proposed for the southwestern corner of the intersection of County Roads 4 and 25, formerly the Grandview restaurant, was being discussed.
In Central Huron’s correspondence Central Huron council members requested a meeting to review the issue, an idea North Huron supported and decided to inform the next North Huron Township council, after the election, that the meeting had been requested.
The former Grandview restaurant site’s service, however, was defered as council didn’t know if it would be subject to the new cross border servicing agreement.
North Huron Chief Operator Don Nicholson stated the former Grandview had a one inch municipal water and a five inch sanitary sewer service, both of which needed to be increased by an inch for the new development.
What troubled councillors, however, wasn’t the upgrade of service but whether or not the land had been rezoned.
“This is a different issue [than the Van Heesch application],” MacGowan said. “They have an existing hookup and, in my mind, I would suggest that if this existing hookup is in place, the 30 per cent kick-in isn’t necessary.
“If there is a rezoning changing it, however, then I think it does trigger the policy,” he said. “I suggest we should put it off until we have a definitive decision on the issue.”
North Huron Township Council decided to approve one application for services under its recently established cross-border service policy and defer another at its Oct. 20 meeting.
The first application, which was on behalf of Henry Van Heesch, owner of the Europarts company which recently opened a new showroom and work area outside of Belgrave, was approved. The second application was for a property in Morris-Turnberry.
Installation of the services, however, is deferred until Morris-Turnberry agrees to specific terms in the policy, including a payment in lieu of taxes equal to 30 per cent of the municipal taxes collected on the property.
The property, which includes the former Jag’s restaurant property on Amberley Road, is just receiving water, as sewer service was already provided.
Councillor Bill Knott asked council whether they could split the payment-in-lieu of taxes to 15 per cent since only one service was being run, however he was told that could set a risky precedent for the municipality.
Two motions were required to support servicing the Morris-Turnberry property, one to approve the connection and one to confirm this that the service will fall under the new agreement.
While council approved both motions, some questions remained as Van Heesch asked about the surcharge.
“From what I understand, the 30 per cent surcharge coming from here to Morris-Turnberry will result in Morris-Turnberry charging me 30 per cent more,” he said.
Councillor Archie MacGowan took Van Heesch’s statement as an opportunity to explain North Huron’s stance on the issue.
“As a requirement, 30 per cent of the municipal taxes they collect have to flow back to North Huron,” he said. “It’s only on the municipal portion and it’s a payment in lieu of 30 per cent. North Huron is in need of tax dollars. We’re granting the services and looking for payment in lieu of taxes.
“North Huron hasn’t ever contemplated up-charging [Morris-Turnberry ratepayers] an additional 30 per cent, this was just supposed to be a flow-through.”
Van Heesch said his understanding of the issue was Morris-Turnberry would decide at its Oct. 21 meeting, however the issue was not brought up during open session at that meeting.
“If they are going to charge us extra, I’ll withdraw the application,” he said. “It’s terrible that businesses have to pay for that.”
Read more...
 
« StartPrev12NextEnd »

Page 1 of 2